Does sorrow and sadness in a book make you read it more?

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Ganesha
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Does sorrow and sadness in a book make you read it more?

Postby Ganesha » Tue Nov 02, 2010 8:57 pm

Why do we read books that are inherently sad?

All our lives, our thoughts and actions are always geared towards minimizing pain. And yet, when it comes to reading, we love to read books of sorrow, sadness and gloom. In our search for happiness, is it necessary to dip ourselves completely into somebody's sorrow in order for us to understand the sheer sublimity of life? Or are we just destined for agony, created out of malady, and live because pain exists and had it not been its existence in the world, we would have long since been wiped off from the map of the universe?

I could read books of happiness, of grandeur, of positive motivation, of pure fantasy. Every reader has a choice. But given the choice to read somebody's pain in minuscule detail over somebody else's shimmering happiness, there are many among us who would choose the former path. Why is pain so enticing, so addictive, so strong and powerful that we have to lose our existence over it, even at times of no despair and beauty?

Think. Express. I am not alone. Probably. Are you?
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kazi
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Re: Does sorrow and sadness in a book make you read it more?

Postby kazi » Wed Nov 03, 2010 6:26 am

For me reading has been somewhat like eating... in that, variety brings out the pleasures of the act. I'd like to think of my reading as a conversation between me and the author... the more the merrier. I like to read multiple books at the same time. That is one of the reasons I fail to dip myself deeply into one book. I read very slow and try to objectively digest what the writer is telling me. Not surprisingly, I read faster when I am reading multiple books at the same time.

My experience with reading is usually impersonal and rational. I'm not saying that I do not empathize. I do. But what I am saying is that I try to understand what the author is saying and why (s)he is saying. On one hand this gives me the ability to have a bigger picture, but on the other hand, it is difficult for me to immerse myself in the book in all its glorified extremities. On one hand I feel as if I have a personal relation with the authors, but on the other hand the *addiction* eludes me, thus far.
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.

Ganesha
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Joined: Mon Jun 15, 2009 8:51 am
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Re: Does sorrow and sadness in a book make you read it more?

Postby Ganesha » Thu Nov 04, 2010 9:04 pm

I cannot imagine reading multiple books at a time. I cannot cook and talk over the phone. So no way I could read and do other stuff. Did not know there were people reading multiple books at a time.
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kazi
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Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:55 am

Re: Does sorrow and sadness in a book make you read it more?

Postby kazi » Fri Nov 05, 2010 7:07 am

Its quite normal for me. I think that is because I am such a slow reader: it takes time for me to digest stuff. But while that digestion is going on, I think my input buffer can continue absorbing data. That might explain why I can go through multiple books faster than one book at a time.

I am sure many other people process information similarly. On average people can do 5 +/- 2 things at the same time. Even a simple thing like driving requires 4 or more conscious processing. You might be under-estimating your capabilities, @Ganesha.
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.


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