What about Teej

Nepal specific discussions on culture, spirituality and the arts
kazi
Posts: 978
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:55 am

What about Teej

Postby kazi » Tue Aug 25, 2009 8:42 am

Can anybody provide details on how Teej came to be celebrated about the Nepalis?
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.

AshaKoKiran
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Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 1:05 am

Re: What about Teej

Postby AshaKoKiran » Wed Aug 26, 2009 1:00 pm

My mother used to tell me stories about "Teej", "Sosthani" . I really do not remember the real story because I was never interested in it. I know for sure its all done by the wives for their husbands either for their long life or to get a good husband in life. I actually am not in favor of teej. I donot think fasting and worshiping would help your husband to have a long life. In my opinion, there are thousands of other things you can do to show that you love your loved ones.

Do woman really have to do that? It all depends in the society you live and Nepalese society is a small and fragile one. If a neighbor finds out that the daugther-in-law next door is not fasting then the whole community will get to know that. Daugther-in-laws cannot refrain when her mother-in-law is fasting. Thus its all about dependency and society threats and not about the true celebration of Teej.

Moreover, 90% of women outside the country donot have time to celebrate teej in that religious manner but still they have a good married life. So I say celebrate teej, have fun, dance but donot make it a complusion. Its nothing but a trend that some people created to maybe subdue the feminine mind. Time has changed a lot its not necessary you do the same thing, with the same set of mind today.
Mero desh mero PaheChan.

kazi
Posts: 978
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:55 am

Re: What about Teej

Postby kazi » Thu Aug 27, 2009 2:07 am

I totally agree with AshaKoKiran. I'd rather do anything and everything for a loved one rather than some senseless compulsion enforced by culture. I have to admit, I have mostly found some good reasoning in culture, but some are just senseless, biased and unfair. We really have to accept the rational ones and reconsider the others.
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.

alicepou

Re: What about Teej

Postby alicepou » Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:47 am

Replying to Kazi's question:

Teej is celebrated in Nepal since Hindus from India first settled in Nepal and influenced the local animist culture of then Nepal; however, even though Teej has cultural roots that developed in and around current India, overtime it also gained its own Nepali characteristics.

In this festival, married women worship lord Shiva for the long lives of their husbands, and prosperity of their family, and unmarried girls worship lord Shiva to get a good husband. It is also said that Goddess Parvati fasted on this day to get lord Shiva as her husband.

In Nepal, Teej falls between planting season and weeding season. After the arduous job of plantation of paddy and millet (mostly done by women), women get weak and tired, but unfortunately they do not get enough care in their husband’s home. Thus, parents and especially brothers bring their sisters and daughters home, and feed them nutritious food.

As Nepal constitutes of inaccessible Himalayan Mountains and deep rivers, frequently seeing friends and family members married to a person of another village/reason becomes almost impossible. Thus, Teej is also an occasion of friends and family reunion.

Special thanks to my dad for helping me with the infos so I could share it in this forum :)

Umesh
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Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 10:56 am

Re: What about Teej

Postby Umesh » Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:32 am

I agree with most of alicepou's points about Teej's origin. However, I think the paragraph

alicepou wrote:...
In Nepal, Teej falls between planting season and weeding season. After the arduous job of plantation of paddy and millet (mostly done by women), women get weak and tired, but unfortunately they do not get enough care in their husband’s home. Thus, parents and especially brothers bring their sisters and daughters home, and feed them nutritious food.


doesn't represent the totality of today's Teej. Even though the mindset and supposition is still along this line for most of the women (and men), I think this is a description of Teej of the past. Teej is becoming more of a celebration than 'fasting for husband'. I have seen and I know a lot of women who would enjoy celebrating Teej at their (or say husband's) home. Well, my point here is that alicepou's paragraph describes supposition/belief/origin about/of Teej but it is not a complete truth in present context.

But even talking about origin, it is interesting to note that, in the past, when the parents wanted to take their daughter to their home 'to feed nutritious food', they could not do so by giving the very reason; instead they had to make excuses: 'she is going to worship for her husband'. Unfortunate. Coming to teej of today, I even do not believe much on the nutritious food reasoning because the women are fasting most of the time except for the 'darr khane program' (the feast on the night before the teej day), even where I usually find 'the men' enjoying more of the feast than the women who are already thinking (perhaps even scared) how to stay not eating the whole next day.

PS: a funny note on time is changing for Teej: Until last year, each and every Teej song would be against the husband and in-laws....... but I heard a new Teej song supporting husband this year ;).... interesting!

sharon

Re: What about Teej

Postby sharon » Wed Sep 02, 2009 10:14 am

I also heard the same thing about the Teej, same as whatever the story is mentioned above or below by the friends. And I strongly believe that now a days, people have changed their mind and it is not necessary to do as we heard. I also say that we should not let our culture vanish but we should bring it in a positive way to let the world know about it. For example - we could celebrate the teej as our women's day.

kazi
Posts: 978
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:55 am

Re: What about Teej

Postby kazi » Wed Sep 02, 2009 11:19 am

@alicepou Thank you for your interesting post. And thanks to your dad also. I agree that Nepal has a whole lot in common with Northern India. Similarities in religion, culture, food, etc. is pretty obvious. I think we are more similar to northern Indians than northern India is with South India. But I digress. Basing culture on agriculture makes a lot of sense to me given that historically we have always been grounded in agriculture. I know this is a bit of a generalization but for the purpose of this discussion, the point is well taken.

@Umesh Your reflections on the topic are absolutely valid. Culture does evolve and today many of our cultural activities are based non only on religious and social norms, but also on the values of new generations. A good example is the Thursday visit to Bagalamukhi mandir. I doubt if the throngs of teenage boys and girls that we see around the temple are deeply pious and religiously devout. In retrospect, I know my intentions were not only to visit Bagalamukhi mai because I made sure that I was looking my best and had an eye out for a pretty prospect. Nevertheless, the culture has been maintained for whatever reasons. And even such evolution is okay. In fact evolution of culture should be encouraged as long as it serves a better purpose.
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.

Ganesha
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Re: What about Teej

Postby Ganesha » Thu Sep 02, 2010 11:12 pm

I just came to know from my Indian friends that Teej is also celebrated in India. Not only is the name of the festival the same, the way it is celebrated matches that with ours! They said Teej is celebrated at least all of over Madhya Pradesh. Found it interesting.
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kazi
Posts: 978
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2009 11:55 am

Re: What about Teej

Postby kazi » Fri Sep 03, 2010 5:49 am

Interesting.. I thought it was celebrated by the people of Khas - origin. Even in Nepal, not everybody celebrates Teej.
--
"Mother and motherland are more precious than heaven." But that does not mean we must cling to our mothers. The least I can do for Nepal is to bring awareness among the Nepali people. And this Nepali forum is the platform for me.


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